All About F1 in 72 Easy Steps
Find out what the FIA's regulations allow and forbid;
 
How Formula One cars are built; Where the races may take place; Who runs the events and how; and
 
Why Formula One is the Number One Formula.
 
Click on the question to find the answer
 
1. Who organises the Formula One World Championship?
 
2. How far back does Formula One go?
 
3. Why was the Federation Internationale De L'Automobile (FIA) created?
 
4. "Formula One": what is the current formula?
 
5. What is a Grand Prix?
 
6. How is the World Champion title obtained?
 
7. What is the scale of points?
 
8. How many Grands Prix are held every year?
 
9. Is the Grand Prix timetable always the same?
 
10. Can any circuit host a Grand Prix?
 
11. How is a circuit deemed suitable to hold a Grand Prix?
 
12. What criteria must a constructor meet to be able to participate?
 
13. Who is the constructor of a Formula One car?
 
14. Do the constructors have to compete throughout the season?
 
15. On what criteria are the Formula One technical regulations based?
 
16. Can any driver compete in a Grand Prix?
 
17. Are the teams allowed to change driver during the season?
 
18. Do the drivers keep the same race number throughout the season?
 
19. Is the number of laps during the practice sessions free?
 
20. What is the warm-up?
 
21. Can the drivers change cars during the event?
 
22. How do drivers qualify for a race?
 
23. How is the starting grid arranged?
 
24. Do the constructors design special cars for the qualifying session?
 
25. How long does a Grand Prix last?
 
26. Does a Grand Prix always go ahead, rain Or shine?
 
27. How powerful are Formula One engines?
 
28. What speeds do Formula One cars reach?
 
29. Are the cars currently used faster than the cars of the "Turbo" era?
 
30. Can a Formula One car race without suspension like a Kart?
 
31. Why do the regulations require the cars to have a flat bottom?
 
32. Are Formula One cars fitted with a starter?
 
33. Do Formula One cars have automatic gearboxes?
 
34. How many gear ratios do Formula One cars have?
 
35. Do Formula One cars have better brakes than series produced cars?
 
36. Is a special type of fuel used in Formula One?
 
37. How many tyres are authorised per car at each Grand Prix?
 
38. How is the type of rubber selected?
 
39. Are the cars checked during the event?
 
40. How is the fuel checks carried out?
 
41. How can prohibited electronic functions be detected?
 
42. Who are the Race Officials?
 
43. What role does the technical delegate play?
 
44. Who are the stewards and what are their powers?
 
45. What type of sanctions may be imposed?
 
46. What is a "time penalty"?
 
47. Are the Stewards' decisions final?
 
48. What is the International Court of Appeal?
 
49. What are the prerogatives of the clerk of the course and the race director?
 
50. How is the race started?
 
51. How are false starts detected?
 
52. What happens if a driver stalls on the starting grid?
 
53. What happens if more than one driver is unable to start of the formation lap?
 
54. Are there special starting procedures in the event of rain?
 
55. Is the race stopped in case of rain?
 
56. Can the race be stopped?
 
57. What procedures apply when the race is interrupted?
 
58. When is the Safety Car used?
 
59. What procedure is followed for the Safety Car?
 
60. Do the laps covered behind the Safety Car count?
 
61. May a car stop at its pit whilst the Safety Car is on the track?
 
62. Is refueling allowed during the race?
 
63. What does the term “Parc Ferme” mean?
 
64. Are there any speed limits?
 
65. In what conditions are the cars weighed?
 
66. What are the different signals which the officials may give to the competitors?
 
67. Does the chequered flag always signal the finish?
 
68. Is private testing on circuits authorised?
 
69. What are the specifications for Car Livery on Formula 1 Cars?
 
70. What are the rules and regulations for Suspending and Resuming Races?
 
71. What rules are applicable for Spare Cars and Engines?
 
72. Do Formula 1 Cars go through any scrutiny?

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1. Who organizes the Formula One World Championship?
The sporting branch of the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile, FIA Sport. The FIA governs motor sport world-wide and, as such, administers the Formula One and World Rally Championships, and the F3000 and GT Championships, as well as all other international motor sport.

The Formula One World Championship was created in 1950 and is the oldest FIA Championship. It also has the greatest media impact. It is estimated that the sixteen Grand Prix of the 1998 season attracted over 55 billion television viewers, whilst the printed press maintained a significant presence, with an average of 650 journalists and photographers from 63 countries traveling from all over the world to cover each event.

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2. How far back does Formula One go?
There was no "formula" from the heroic era of the motor car in 1894 (the year of the first motor race in history, from Paris to Rouen) up until 1900. The existing vehicles were simply raced. A differentiation was made between the cars on the basis of their method of propulsion (petrol or steam), and their number of seats. At the time, cars always had at least two seats, and it was not until the end of the 1920s that single-seater cars were used. The invention of the rear-view mirror made an important contribution to this development, since one of the mechanic's tasks was to warn the driver that someone was trying to overtake him.

Immediately after its creation in 1904, the FIA, which is the international sporting authority, became obliged to formulate restrictions to ensure the safety of the drivers and spectators, and to guide motor sport in a direction which would benefit the development of road cars, thus setting a pattern which has been repeated throughout the long history of motor sport. From 1907 to 1939, almost every possible formula was tried. The minimum weight, maximum weight, consumption and bore were each restricted in their turn, but the formula most frequently used, even after 1939, was to limit the cylinder capacity of the engines. This restriction was first introduced in 1914.

Following the introduction of the first "formula" defined by the FIA (which restricted maximum weight) in 1904, categories were created for the smaller cars, yet the name "Formula One" did not appear until after the Second World War. The FIA Formula One World Championship was created in 1950, and the first Formula One race counting for the FIA Formula One World Championship was the British Grand Prix, which took place in Silverstone the 13th May 1950.

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3. Why was the Federation Internationale De l'Automobile (FIA) created?
Prior to 1904, every country and automobile club organized races, each with its own set of regulations.
It was thus virtually impossible to organize international races, since there were no common regulations.

The most influential Automobile Clubs of the time therefore decided to put an end to this situation, which was preventing motor sport from flourishing, by creating an international organization which would draw up common regulations, applicable to races all over the world. This led to the birth of the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile (the FIA), which was thus able to guarantee to English or German drivers, for example, that the same rules would apply whether they were racing in France, Italy, Belgium, or Monaco.

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4. "Formula one": what is the current formula?
In addition to a large number of specifications relating, in particular, to safety and aerodynamics, the current formula restricts the cylinder capacity of the engine to 2,4 litres V8 engines, prohibits supercharging and stipulates a minimum weight of 600 kg, including the weight of the driver and his race equipment (except during qualifying when it is 650 kg).

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5. What is a Grand Prix?
The first race to be given the "Grand Prix" title was the Grand Prix de l'Automobile Club de France held at Le Mans in 1906. It was restricted to "big cars", which could be described as the "Formula One" cars of the period. From then on, the term Grand Prix became associated with all types of circuit races for cars. Major events, which were the equivalent of today's Grands Prix, were called "Grandes Epreuves" (Great Events). However, the FIA was opposed to the popular usage of the "Grand Prix" title, which it wished to reserve for events counting towards its Formula One World Championship. Henceforth, it became prohibited to use the Grand Prix title for an event which did not count towards this Championship, except for very rare cases with historic justification, such as the Grand Prix de Pau, which is currently a Formula 3 event.

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6. How is the World Champion title obtained?
There are two titles: "drivers" and "constructors". The drivers' title has been awarded since 1950, whilst the Constructors' title was introduced in 1958. The constructors add together the points scored in every race by each car of their make (they cannot enter more than two), in the same way as the drivers accumulate the total number of points scored in each event (at one time they could cancel their worst results).

In the event of a dead heat, the title is decided on the basis of the quality of the places obtained, that is, the number of first places, followed by the number of second places, etc. 

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7. What is the scale of points?
1st place: 10 points
2nd place: 8 points
3rd place: 6 points
4th place: 5 points
5th place: 4 points
6th place: 3 points
7th place: 2 points
8th place: 1 point

There was a time when the driver who recorded the fastest lap was given 1 point.
(The only exception to this is when a race is suspended and cannot be restarted. If less than 75 per cent of the race distance has been completed half points are awarded, and if less than two laps have been completed, no points are awarded.)

For example, if in a given race Kimi Raikkonen finishes third for Ferrari and team mate Felipe Massa fifth, then Kimi and Massa score six and four points respectively towards the drivers’ championship, while Ferrari score ten points (six plus four) towards the constructors’ championship.

The driver with the most points at the end of the season is declared drivers’ champion. Similarly the constructor with the most points is declared constructors’ champion.

In the case of a dead heat for a championship place then the driver or team with the higher number of superior race results will be awarded the place. For example, if McLaren and Renault finish the season top of the table on equal points, then the team with the most race wins will be declared champion. 

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8. How many Grands Prix are held every year?
When the World Championship was created, Formula One was not as popular as it is today, and the 1950 Championship, for example, consisted of only 7 Grands Prix. This figure gradually increased, peaking at 17 events in 1977. It was then limited to 16, and the possibility of holding a maximum of 17 events was reintroduced in 1996.

In year 2007 season, a total of 17 races were held and for year 2008 season, 18 races are planned
A minimum of eight events out of those entered on the calendar must take place for the World Champion Drivers' and Constructors' titles to be awarded. The 1997 Argentine Grand Prix was the 600th Grand Prix counting towards the FIA Formula One World Championship. 

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9. Is the Grand prix timetable always the same?
Yes, as follows:

Friday*: Free practice
Two one and a half-hour practice sessions on Friday       
Timings: from 11:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 14:00

Saturday: Free practice
Another one-hour session on Saturday morning              
Timings: from 09:00 to 09:45 and from 10:15 to 11:0
Qualifying practice from 13:00 to 14:00

Sunday: Warm-up (30 minutes) 4 hours 30 minutes before the start of the race
Start of the race: usually at 14:00 (local time), except for exceptional   cases.
(*) Thursday for the Monaco Grand Prix. 

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10. Can any circuit host a Grand Prix?
Originally, a Grand Prix could be held anywhere, but the increases in car performance have forced the FIA to impose stringent conditions on the lay-out, width and length of a circuit, as well as the surface, safety provisions and facilities. 

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11. How is a circuit deemed suitable to hold a Grand Prix?
Each circuit must be homologated by the FIA Circuits and Safety Commission following a series of inspections which are carried out from the start of the work right up until the inauguration of the circuit. The homologation criteria are less strict for circuits hosting events for slower formulae. In addition to the initial procedure, the circuits sometimes have to carry out maintenance work or update their facilities so that their homologation may be renewed. In the past, with the exception of the Monaco Grand Prix, which is the only event to take place within a town itself, circuits tended to be very fast with long straights. The increase in the cars' performances has meant that these straights have had to give way to series of bends, which are the only means of preventing excessive speeds.

Similarly, very long tracks, like that at the old Nurburgring (22.835 km), have had to be abandoned, since the costs involved in providing the safety facilities and personnel required by the regulations together with the technical facilities necessary for television broadcasting are too great. Monaco is still the shortest circuit (3.328 km), whilst Spa is the longest (6.940 km).  

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12. What criteria must a constructor meet to be able to participate?
A constructor who wishes to become involved in Formula One must submit his entry to the FIA, to which he must provide evidence that he is both the designer and constructor of the chassis of his car, and that he also has sufficient technical and financial resources to take part in the whole of the Championship. 

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13. Who is the constructor of a formula one car?
By Formula One constructor, we mean the chassis manufacturer. In most cases, this is not the same as the engine manufacturer, and the name of the chassis manufacturer is always given before that of the engine manufacturer. In the event of winning the Constructors' World Championship, the title is awarded to the chassis manufacturer. 

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14. Do the constructors have to compete throughout the season?

Yes. Any constructor who fails to turn up at an event may be fined several hundred thousand dollars per event and per car, except in the case of exceptional circumstances (but the FIA is very strict when it comes to defining such a case). A constructor may not join the championship during the season. 

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15. On what criteria are the Formula One Technical regulations based?
They address two main concerns:

  1. Controlling performance, in the interests of safety, whilst at the same time preserving the visual perception of speed and of the technological prowess of a Formula One car;
  2. Ensuring the best possible level of passive safety in the event of an accident.

There are thus restrictions on cylinder capacity, fuel, tyre dimensions, the minimum weight and width of the car, as well as on the dimensions and positioning of the aerodynamic devices and on electronic driving aids, most of which are prohibited.
Moreover, there are stipulations relating not only to the strength of the chassis and the protective rollbars, but also to flexible fuel tanks (inspired by military aviation), fire extinguishers, harnesses, head and neck protection, and so on. The positions of the fuel and oil tanks are specified and they must have special protection. Access to and from the cockpit together with its dimensions are also controlled.

For financial reasons, engines which are not reciprocating or 4-stroke are prohibited, and the engines are restricted to a maximum of twelve cylinders which cannot have an oval section. It is obligatory for each car to have four wheels, only two of which are driven (yes, in the past there were Formula One cars with six wheels!).  

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16. Can any driver compete in a Grand Prix?
In order to be able to take part in a Grand Prix, a driver must hold a "Super Licence", which is awarded on the basis of his past record in junior formulae and of his having a valid contract with a Formula One team which has entered the World Championship. 

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17. Are the teams allowed to change driver during the season?
Yes, each team with two cars may change the driver of its first car once in the season. For the second car, a maximum of three drivers may take turns, without restriction, during any one season. This excludes cases of exceptional circumstances, which are considered separately. Notification of a change of driver must be made before the end of the scrutineering and the sporting checks (the Thursday preceding the event, at 16:00).  

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18. Do the drivers keep the same race number throughout the season?
Yes, if they stay with the same team, as the numbers are attributed to the constructors, not the drivers, at the beginning of the season. The only exceptions to this are the reigning World Champion, who is always allocated number 1 even if he is driving for a different make from that with which he won the title, and his team mate who is given number 2.  

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19. Is the number of laps during the practice sessions free?
In practice, teams are limited to two cars per session. A nominated third driver or either race driver can use these cars in the session. While individual practice sessions are not compulsory, a driver must take part in at least one Saturday session to be eligible for the race.

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20. What is the warm-up?
The warm-up is a free practice session which takes place on the morning of the race and lasts for half an hour. Only drivers who have qualified may take part in it. It is obligatory for this practice session to begin four and a half hours before the start of the race. If all the practice sessions have taken place in dry conditions and it begins to rain after the warm-up, or vice-versa, the Race Director may authorize an additional 15-minute practice session, which will allow the cars to adapt to the weather conditions.

The warm-up is very important, since it enables the teams to test the cars in their race configuration, in conditions (pressure, temperature, humidity, etc.) which are, theoretically, very similar to those of the race itself. 

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21. Can the drivers change cars during the event?
In each of Friday's two practice sessions, teams may run one additional driver, though each team is still limited to two cars. Any holder of a Super License may run as an additional driver.

Teams may use up to four race drivers during a season, all of whom may score points in the championship. A driver change may be made with the permission of the stewards any time before the start of qualifying. The new driver must use the engine and tyres allocated to the original driver.

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22. How do drivers qualify for a race?

Saturday’s one-hour qualifying session is split into three distinct parts, each with multiple drivers on track simultaneously, and each with the drivers running as many laps as they want:

Q1: All 22 cars may run laps at any time during the first 15 minutes of the hour. At the end of the first 15 minutes, the six slowest cars drop out and fill the final six grid places.

Q2: After a seven-minute break, the times will be reset and the 16 remaining cars then will then run in a second 15-minute session - again they may complete as many laps as they want at any time during that period. At the end of the 15 minutes, the six slowest cars drop out and fill places 11 to 16 on the grid.

Q3: After a further eight-minute break, the times are reset and the final 15-minute session will feature a shootout between the remaining 10 cars to decide pole position and the starting order for the top 10 grid places. Again, these cars may run as many laps as they wish.

In the first two 15-minute sessions, cars may run any fuel load and drivers knocked out after those sessions may refuel ahead of the race. However, the top-ten drivers in the final 15-minute session may only replace the fuel they used during that session before the start of the race.

If a driver is deemed by the stewards to have stopped unnecessarily on the circuit or impeded another driver during any practice session, then they may drop the driver such number of grid positions that they consider appropriate.

In earlier days, during the Qualifying time, each driver had a maximum of 12 laps to set the fastest possible time.

The driver who set the fastest time started from the first line in the so-called "pole position", and the others will line up on the grid in the order of the times they had achieved. In the event of a tie, the driver who achieved the time first was given priority.

Any driver whose fastest time in qualifying practice exceeded the pole position time by 107% or more was not allowed to start without special permission of the stewards.

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23. How is the starting grid arranged?
The starting grid consists of two cars per row in staggered formation, with an interval of eight meters between each row and the next. 

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24. Do the constructors design special cars for the qualifying session?
Special cars as such are not built specifically for qualification, but, in a few cases only, special engines, or even special set-ups, are designed for qualifying practice, so that the engine's full potential may be reached, even though this shortens its life-span.

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25. How long does a Grand Prix last?
The distance of a Grand Prix is the least number of laps which exceeds 305 km, and no race may last for more than two hours. On certain slower circuits (such as Monaco), in the event of rain, the Clerk of the Course is sometimes obliged to stop the race after two hours. 

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26. Does a Grand Prix always go ahead, rain or shine?
Yes, a Formula One Grand Prix takes place in all weather conditions, and the tyre manufacturers have developed treaded tyres which help to avoid the risk of aquaplaning. Nevertheless, the Race Director has the power to stop the event, if this becomes necessary for safety reasons. Apart from grip, the greatest problem in the event of rain is visibility, which is significantly reduced due to the spray thrown up by the cars' tyres. In order to counteract this problem, the cars are equipped with a red light at the rear which must be switched on if it starts to rain.  

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27. How powerful are Formula One engines?
Even though the constructors refuse to divulge details of their engine power, it is rumoured that during the 1998 season the maximum power easily exceeded seven hundred horse power and that now, in some case, it may exceed eight hundred. Manufacturers of engines with eight or ten cylinders maintain that maximum power is not always the most important factor, since there is also the power curve which in their case is better at a low engine speed. Having power available at lower engine speeds is of equal importance, especially on slow circuits.  

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28. What speeds do Formula One cars reach?
The Grand Prix with the highest average speed in history was the 1971 Italian Grand Prix, won by Peter Gethin in a BRM at an average speed of 242.615 kph (150.754 mph) on the Monza circuit which at the time did not yet have any chicanes (interestingly, a recent computer simulation suggested that current Formula One cars would achieve an average speed of well over 300 kph - 190 mph - on the original circuit).

In 1998, the fastest Grand Prix was the Italian, won by Michael Schumacher at an average of 237.591 kph (147.633 mph). The highest speed recorded during practice in 1998 was 244.413 kph (151.971 mph), which was set at Monza by Eddie Irvine, whilst the highest straight line speed recorded during a Grand Prix in the 1998 season was set by David Coulthard, at 356.5 kph (221.5 mph), during the German Grand Prix. The lowest average speed of a Grand Prix winner in 1998 was 141.458 kph (87.898 mph), and was recorded by Mika Hakkinnen in the Monaco Grand Prix.  

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29. Are the cars currently used faster than the cars of the "turbo" era?
If a 1.5-litre turbocharged car were produced today, as was the case up until 1988, it would be a great deal faster than the contemporary 3-litre cars. However, contemporary cars benefit from significant technological progress, allowing them to exceed the speeds of the 1988 turbocharged models, despite the fact that these were able to rely on over 1200 horse power in qualifying! 

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30. Can a Formula One car race without suspension like a kart?
The regulations stipulate genuine suspension - the fitting of silent-blocks is not sufficient. However, the current cars have very little suspension travel, in order to restrict changes in trim which would influence the effectiveness of the aerodynamic devices. 

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31. Why do the regulations require the cars to have a flat bottom?
It became evident that significant downforce could be achieved by giving the bottom of the two side members the shape of inverted aeroplane wings. In order to reduce downforce (the so-called "ground effect"), and thus reduce cornering speed, the FIA made it obligatory for each car to have a flat bottom between the rear wheel centre line and the rear of the front wheels, as well as a ground clearance obtained by means of a skid block attached to the flat bottom. The constructors have nevertheless managed to optimize the behavior of the aerofoils and aerodynamic extractors situated behind the gear box, to such an extent that a current Formula One car is capable of a transverse acceleration of up to 4G, whereas a road car does not exceed 1G.  

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32. Are Formula One cars fitted with a starter?
A starter has not been obligatory for several years, and teams choose not to fit one in order to prevent an additional source of energy from causing incidents such as a fire or an explosion. They are authorised to use a portable starter in front of their pits, but if a driver stalls on the circuit during the race, he has to retire, even if the car restarts once the marshals have pushed it away from a dangerous position. Most cars are however fitted with sophisticated electronically controlled anti-stall systems.  

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33. Do Formula One cars have automatic gearboxes?
Automatic gearboxes are prohibited by the technical regulations. However, all the cars are equipped with semiautomatic gearboxes: to change gear, the driver no longer has to activate the clutch pedal at the same time as the gear lever. He simply presses a button on the side of his steering wheel. There is a button on each side: one for changing up, the other for changing down. He therefore no longer has to take his hand off the steering wheel, and this hydraulic device, which is electronically activated, allows the driver to change gear in one or two hundredths of a second, which is unquestionably faster than with a conventional system.

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34. How many gear ratios do Formula One cars have?
The rapid changes possible with semiautomatic gearboxes mean that transmissions with a greater number of ratios (six or seven) can be installed. On circuits with a large number of bends, the drivers only use four or five ratios. Reverse gear is obligatory, but must not be used in the pit-lane. 

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35. Do Formula One cars have better brakes than series produced cars?
The brakes on series-produced cars are derived from the disc brakes which were first used in racing. All Formula One cars are equipped with brakes with calipers made from light alloy while the discs and pads tend to be made from synthetic materials, i.e. carbon/carbon. Their resistance to heat is much greater than that of series-produced brakes (which is why, in certain conditions, the insides of the wheels appear completely incandescent) and they weigh significantly less. Their braking power is thus uncommonly high: at the end of a straight, at maximum speed (around 340 kph - 212.5 mph), a Formula One car can brake at less than 100 metres in order to take a slow corner. Naturally, carbon/carbon is expensive: it takes six months to produce a disc, at a temperature of between 900 and 2000°C. The same material is now used to produce clutch discs. 

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36. Is a special type of fuel used in Formula One?
No. Unleaded ("green") fuel is used, similar to that available at petrol stations. It has to comply with the strictest EEC standards concerning pollution.
 
At one time, the fuel used in Formula One consisted of a mixture of hydrocarbons, and was a very special fuel, which bore little resemblance to commercial petrol.

The FIA introduced regulations, with the dual aim of steering the oil companies' research in the right direction, so that it would benefit the ordinary motor car, and of significantly reducing pollution: Formula One cars are already using fuel that complies with the specifications which will be mandatory in the European Union from the year 2000 (maximum sulphur content 150 parts per million); from 2000, Formula One cars have been complying with the specification to be introduced in 2005 (maximum sulphur content 50 parts per million).

The fuel used by Formula One cars is in general not yet available from petrol pumps. However, the oil companies are now using fuels which could be commercialized, and which probably will be in the future. Thus Formula One serves as a laboratory, which will ultimately be of benefit to the ordinary motor car (see also question 40).  

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37. How many tyres are authorised per car at each grand prix?

From 2007 onwards, Formula One racing features just one tyre supplier, with all teams using identical Bridgestone rubber. The aims of this move are to create
closer racing and to reduce testing and development costs.

At each Grand Prix every team will be given access to two specifications of dry-weather tyre and each driver must make use of both specifications during the race (wet races excepted). A white groove on the tread of the softer of the two available compounds will allow spectators to distinguish which tyre a driver is using.

Over the race weekend, each driver has access to 14 sets of dry-weather tyres. Four of those sets (two sets of each specification) may be used on Friday, with the remaining 10 sets (five of each specification) available from Saturday morning onwards. Prior to qualifying each driver must surrender one set of each specification.

Teams are free to use wet-weather tyres as they see fit during qualifying and the race. However, during the preceding practice sessions wet-weather tyres may only be used if the track has been declared wet by the race director. Bridgestone may bring different types of wet-weather tyre to cope with various conditions, but all must be pre-approved by the FIA.

All tyres are given a bar code at the start of the weekend so that the FIA can closely monitor their use and ensure that no team is breaking regulations.

Until year 2007, the regulations stipulated that each driver may use a maximum of 32 dry-weather tyres (40 in 1998) and 28 wet-weather tyres throughout the duration of the event. Moreover, each driver used a maximum of two rubber specifications for his dry-weather tyres during free practice, but had to designate the rubber specification he wished to use for the rest of the event before the start of qualifying practice.

Thus, the maximum number of tyres used for qualifying practice, the warm-up and the race was 28 (14 front and 14 rear), chosen from amongst the 32. 

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38. How is the type of rubber selected?
A hard or softer type of rubber is selected on the basis of the driver's style, the design of the car, the atmospheric temperature and the lay-out of the circuit. In general, the slower the circuit and the cooler the temperature, the softer the rubber, allowing greater grip.

On the other hand, high speeds, together with a highly abrasive track and a heavy and powerful car wear the tyres down more quickly. The team and the driver must therefore strike a balance between various options, i.e. whether to mount harder tyres which grip less well but permit fewer pit-stops, or whether to use softer tyres which will have to be changed several times during the race.

A judicious choice sometimes enables one of the less powerful cars to win a Grand Prix. Tyre changes have become a part of the Formula One racing, and the better trained teams usually manage to change all four tyres and refuel in the space of 5 to 10 seconds, depending on the quantity of fuel they want to put in the tank.  

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39. Are the cars checked during the event?

The day before practice begins, the Scrutineers carry out a tour of the garages, checking that all the cars comply with the regulations. In addition to this, spot checks may be carried out at any time, and all the cars which finish the race are checked in the Parc Ferme once they have crossed the finish line. Any car which does not comply with the technical regulations is normally excluded; however the final decision rests with the Stewards.  

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40. How is the fuel checks carried out?
At the start of the season, each team entered in the Championship must provide a sample of 10 litres of the petrol it wishes to use. The sample is analyzed in a specialized laboratory, to check not only that it is in conformity with the Technical Regulations, but also that it is a genuine commercial fuel (see also question 36).

If the sample is approved, an "imprint" (a sort of "genetic code" of the fuel is provided. At the events, the FIA Technical Delegate carries out spot checks, taking samples of petrol from the cars during the practice sessions or after the race. Using gas chromatography and a device for measuring the density of the fuel), the samples are analyzed instantaneously, to see on site whether their "imprint" is identical to the reference imprint approved by the FIA.

If a sample is not in conformity, the Technical Delegate will make a report to the Stewards of the Meeting, who may impose a sanction.

A team may change the petrol it uses several times during the season, but it must have submitted a sample to the FIA and receive approval in each case. 

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41. How can prohibited electronic functions be detected?

On site, at each Grand Prix, the FIA has an electronic laboratory as well as sophisticated equipment and a team of experts who, at any time (even on the starting grid!), may check whether the cars' electronics are concealing electronic driving aids prohibited by the regulations, such as traction control.

The electronics of a Formula One car comprise up to 500,000 lines of source code (software). Obviously, it would be impossible to carry out an in-depth check of such an electronic program, for example on the grid just before the start of the Grand Prix.

Therefore, the procedure is similar to that used for the petrol. The teams provide the FIA with their electronic programme, and the FIA checks it in detail before the start of the season. Once the programme is approved, the FIA keeps an "imprint" (an electronic "genetic code" of the car); at the events, the FIA team assigned to check the electronic programmes makes sure that the programmes installed in the cars do not differ in any way from the approved model. If need be, they may examine in detail only the lines which do not correspond to those of the approved code, and check whether or not they contain one or more parameters in breach of the regulations.

Once again, if anything is not in conformity, the Technical Delegate makes a report to the Stewards of the Meeting who will decide which penalty to impose, including exclusion. 

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42. Who are the Race Officials?
At every Grand Prix meeting there are six key race officials who monitor and control the activities of the stewards and marshals to ensure the smooth and safe running of the event in accordance with FIA regulations.

Four of the six officials are nominated by the FIA. These are the race director (currently Charlie Whiting), a permanent starter and two additional stewards, one of whom is nominated chairman. The additional stewards must be FIA Super Licence holders and must not be of the same nationality as the race organizers.

The other two key officials are nominated by the National Sporting Authority (ASN) of the country holding the race. These are the clerk of the course and an additional steward (who must be a national of the host nation). Both must be FIA Super Licence holders.

The clerk of the course works in consultation with the race director, who has overriding authority. The race director directs the clerk of the course on how to instruct the stewards during the various practice, qualifying and race sessions.

The race director and the clerk of the course, as well as the FIA technical delegate (currently Jo Bauer), must all be present at the event from 10am on Thursday (Wednesday in Monaco) onwards.

The race director, the clerk of the course and the chairman of the stewards must all be in radio contact while cars are on track. Furthermore, at these times the clerk of the course must be in the race-control headquarters and in radio contact with all of the marshal’s posts.

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43. What role does the technical delegate play?

The FIA Technical Delegate heads the team of Scrutineers responsible for checking that the cars comply with the Technical Regulations. If he finds that a car does not comply, he submits a report to the Stewards, but does not have the power to disqualify or penalize a car himself. 

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44. Who are the stewards and what are their powers?

The three Stewards are the judges, or the referees, of an Event. They examine the reports submitted by the various officials and, once they have heard the explanations and defence of all the parties concerned, decide on any sanctions.

In order to ensure sporting equity, the Stewards vary from one event to another; two of them are nominated by the FIA from amongst holders of the Stewards' super licence. The third Steward is designated by the National Sporting Authority of the country in which the event is taking place. The Stewards appointed by the FIA are of a different nationality from that of the country in which the event is taking place.

They may, at any time, impose the sanctions set out in the International Sporting Code and, if they judge the behaviour of a competitor or a driver to be reprehensible, they may request that he be summoned before the World Motor Sport Council.  

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45. What types of sanctions may be imposed?
Stewards have the power to impose various penalties on a driver if he commits an offence during a race. Offences may include jumping the start, causing an avoidable accident, unfairly blocking another driver, impeding another driver when being lapped, speeding in the pit lane etc.

The two most common types are the drive-through penalty and the ten-second time penalty. In the case of the former, the driver must enter the pits, drive through the pit lane at the pit-lane speed limit and rejoin the race without stopping. Depending on the length of the pit lane this can cost a driver a significant amount of time.

More severe is the ten-second time penalty (also commonly known as a stop-go penalty) where the driver must not only enter the pits, but must also stop for ten seconds at his pit before rejoining the race. During this time the driver’s team are not permitted to work on the car.

In extreme cases the stewards may choose to enforce a third type of penalty whereby they can force a driver to drop ten grid positions at the next Grand Prix. So even if the driver in question goes on to qualify in pole position, he will in fact start that race from 11th place.

In the case of the drive-through penalty and the ten-second time penalty, a driver has three laps, from the time his team is notified, to enter the pits (failure to do so may result in a black flag and the driver being excluded from the race).

The only exception is when the penalty is awarded during the final five laps of the race. In this case the driver may continue and complete the race. However, 25 seconds will be added to his total race time, which may drop him considerably in the final race standings. 

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46. What is a "time penalty"?
During the race, the Stewards may also impose a time penalty (sometimes called a "stop-go") on a driver. In this case, the driver must go to at his pit and remain there for 10 seconds. In reality, this penalty involves a far greater loss of time, given the time taken to return to the pit and to leave it again, both at reduced speed. Depending on the configuration of the circuit, this can result in a time loss of between 25 and 40 seconds.

If the time penalty is imposed during the last five laps of a race, 25 seconds will be added to the race time of the driver concerned, instead of a stop-go. 

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47. Are the stewards' decisions final?
No. Any competitor who feels that he has been unfairly penalized by a Stewards' decision may appeal against this decision before the International Court of Appeal. He must declare his intention to do so within one hour of being notified of the Stewards' decision. Similarly, the FIA has the right to defer a decision of the Stewards to the International Court of Appeal, if it believes that the Stewards have misjudged or inappropriately penalized the matter. There have already been cases in which the Stewards or the Clerk of the Course have been penalized by having their licences suspended, or in which competitors' rights have been restored by the International Court of Appeal.  

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48. What is the International court of appeal?
It is the final and highest recourse, and is, in a way, the Federation Internationale de l'Automobile's very own "Supreme Court of Appeal". The International Court of Appeal is independent of the Sport, and its fifteen members, who have a three-year mandate, are chosen from amongst eminent judges and magistrates (some of whom are Supreme Court of Appeal judges in their own country). In order for the International Court of Appeal to be able to convene, at least three judges must be present, none of whom may be of the same nationality as any of the parties concerned.  

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49. What are the prerogatives of the Clerk of the Course and the Race Director?
The Clerk of the Course, who is nominated by the National Sporting Authority from among holders of a FIA Super Licence, is responsible for the co-ordination of all the officials and track marshals at the Grand Prix. Nevertheless, the Clerk of the Course must work closely with, and under the authority of, the Race Director, who is nominated by the FIA. The same Race Director officiates at all the Grands Prix in the Championship.
The Race Director also acts, at present, as Safety Delegate and Official Starter. It is normally the Clerk of the Course who waves the traditional chequered flag at the end of the race.  

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50. How is the race started?
Prior to every Grand Prix the teams and drivers must adhere to a very strict starting procedure. This gets underway 30 minutes before the formation lap when the pit lane is opened.

Drivers are then free to complete a reconnaissance lap of the circuit before taking up their grid positions. If a driver wishes to complete additional reconnaissance laps he must pass through the pit lane each time in order to bypass the grid.

The pit lane closes 15 minutes prior to the formation lap. Any drivers still in the pit lane at this time will have to start the race from there.

Ten minutes before the start the grid must be cleared except for team technical staff, race officials and drivers. With three minutes to go all cars must have their wheels fitted (any car not complying will have to start from the back of the grid or the pit lane).

With a minute to go all cars must have their engines running. All personnel must then leave the grid at least 15 seconds before the green lights come on to signal the start of the formation lap.

Any driver who has a problem immediately prior to the green light must raise his arm to indicate this. Once the rest of the field has moved off marshals will be push the car into the pit lane. If the driver restarts the car while being pushed he may rejoin the formation lap.

During the formation lap no practice starts are allowed. Overtaking is also forbidden unless passing a car that has slowed due to a technical problem. Passed cars may in turn re-overtake in order to regain their grid position if the problem is resolved during the course of the formation lap.

However, any driver who is still on the grid when all other cars have moved off on the formation lap, but then subsequently gets away, may not re-pass cars to regain his grid position, but must instead start from the back.

Once all cars have safely taken up their grid positions at the end of the formation lap five red lights will appear in sequence at one-second intervals. These red lights are then extinguished to signal the start of the race.

If a driver has a problem on the grid immediately prior to the start he must raise his arm and the start will be aborted. A new formation lap, which will count towards the race distance, will then be completed.

The only exceptions to these start procedures are connected to the weather. If it starts to rain in the three minutes prior to the start then the abort lights will come on and the starting procedure will revert to the 10-minute point to allow teams to change to appropriate tyres.

If the weather is exceptionally bad the race director may choose to abort the start and resume the starting procedure only when conditions have improved. Alternatively, he may decide to start the race behind the safety car.

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51. How are false starts detected?
Each position on the grid is equipped with electronic sensors. These transmit a signal to a central unit located in the control tower if any car moves before the start signal has been given. The Stewards will usually inflict a time penalty on a driver who jumps the start.  

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52. What happens if a driver stalls on the starting grid?
There are three distinct scenarios:

  • If a driver stalls whilst the green light is on (indicating the start of the formation lap), his mechanics are allowed to push the car to get it to start, once all the competitors have left the grid. Since overtaking is not permitted during the formation lap, he must start from the back of the grid. However, a driver who has had difficulty starting the car but who manages to leave before the last car has crossed the Start/Finish line is allowed to overtake during the formation lap and take up his original position on the grid.
  • If a driver stalls on the grid after the formation lap, but before the start, he must raise his arm to notify the starter, who turns on the flashing yellow lights. The start is aborted and the procedure begins again from the "5-minute" board. In order to compensate for the additional formation lap, the race is reduced by one lap. The driver responsible for the false start must start from the back of the grid.
  • If a driver stalls during the start (when all the lights are extinguished), and therefore too late for the starting procedure to be interrupted and aborted, the marshals will push his car to the pit lane once all the competitors have left the grid. If the driver is then able to start his engine, he may rejoin the race. Otherwise, he is pushed back to his pit where his mechanics will take over.

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53. What procedure is followed if more than one driver is unable to start of the formation lap?
If more than one driver is stationary and unable to start the formation lap when the remaining cars have crossed the Line (normally as a result of mechanical problems or a stalled engine), they must all start from the back of the grid provided, of course, their mechanics are able to rectify the problem in time.

These cars must form up at the back of the grid in the order they left to start their formation lap.

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54. Are there special starting procedures in the event of rain?
In the event of rain, the regulations provide for different possibilities, depending on the circumstances:

  • If the rain is such that, in the opinion of the Race Director, it would be dangerous to start the race with the normal procedure, it is possible to start behind the Safety Car. In this case, the revolving yellow lights on the Safety Car, which is positioned at the front of the starting grid, are switched on no later than the one-minute signal. This indicates to the drivers that the race will be started behind the Safety Car. When the green light is switched on, the Safety Car leaves the grid followed by all the other cars. The race starts immediately, and there is no formation lap. Overtaking is permitted only after the Safety Car has returned into the pit lane (see question 55). Prior to this, overtaking is only permitted in order to pass a car which remains on the grid, or in order to retain a grid position provided the car overtaking left the grid before the last car crossed the line.
  • If it starts to rain after the 5-minute signal but before the start of the race, the procedure may be interrupted and recommence at the 15-minute point.
  • If the start of the race is imminent and a particularly heavy shower begins, and the volume of water on the track is such that it cannot be negotiated safely, the procedure may be interrupted by the Race Director, who will order a "10" board with a red background to be shown. This indicates that the start has been aborted and that there will be a delay of at least 10 minutes before the procedure is resumed.
  • If weather conditions have improved at the end of the ten-minute period, a "10" board with a green background will be shown, indicating that the start of the formation lap will be given 10 minutes later.
  • If however, the weather conditions have not improved within ten minutes, the "10" board with the red background is shown again, indicating a further delay of ten minutes. This procedure may be repeated several times, but it is not necessary to wait for the end of the 10 minutes to show the green board.

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55. Is the race stopped in case of rain?
No, normally the race is not stopped if it starts to rain. It is up to the drivers and teams to decide whether they want to stop at their pit to change tyres or continue with the dry-weather tyres.

However, if the conditions are such that driving at racing speed would constitute a serious danger to safety, the Race Director may order the use of the Safety Car (in which case the normal Safety Car procedure would apply - see Nos 55 to 58). If the conditions are so extreme that to carry on driving would be dangerous even behind the Safety Car, the race could be stopped.  

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56. Can the race be stopped?
Yes, the FIA Race Director may interrupt the race at any time in the interests of safety, and particularly if the circuit is blocked. This is done by ordering red flags to be shown around the entire the track.  

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57. What procedures apply when the race is interrupted?
In the event of this happening, there are three possibilities, depending on the number of laps completed by the race leader:

A.
Less than two laps completed
B. Two or more laps completed, but less than 75% of the total distance of the race
C. 75% or more of the total race distance completed.

In case A, which is typical when accidents occur during the start, the first start is considered null and void and the new start is given twenty minutes later.

In case B, the race is considered to be in two parts. Thus, if the safety conditions permit, there is a second start twenty minutes later, for which the grid is determined on the basis of the classification of the penultimate lap before the signal to stop the race was given (red flag). If a second start cannot be given, the classification of the race will be that of the penultimate lap preceding the signal to stop the race and only half the points will be awarded.

In case C, the race will be considered as finished, and all the points will be awarded on the basis of the classification of the penultimate lap preceding the signal to stop the race.  

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58. When is the safety car used?
The Safety Car may only be used when the track is not blocked. The purpose of the Safety Car is to neutralize the racein the event of an accident or other incident which exposes competitors or officials to immediate physical danger. It may also be used in the event of a very heavy and sudden shower (see No. 52).

The Safety Car slows the racing cars so that they do not endanger emergency teams working on or near the track, and are not at risk from slow moving vehicles, such as ambulances. 

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59. What procedure is followed for the safety car?
The safety car’s main function, as its name implies, is to assist in maintaining safe track conditions throughout the Grand Prix weekend. It is driven by an experienced circuit driver and carries an FIA observer who is in permanent radio contact with race control.

If an accident or incident occurs that is not severe enough to warrant suspending the race, but which cannot be dealt with under yellow flags, then the safety car will be called on to the circuit to slow the cars down.

It will come on to the circuit with its orange lights on and all drivers must form a queue behind it with no overtaking allowed. The safety car will signal backmarkers to pass by using its green light until the race leader is immediately behind it, followed by the rest of the field in race order. Any lapped car between cars running on the lead lap must pass those cars and the safety car before proceeding slowly around the track to take up their correct position at the back of the pack. No car is permitted to enter the pits until all cars are lined up behind the safety car in race order.

If the incident that brought out the safety car has blocked the pit straight, the clerk of the course may direct the safety car to lead the field through the pit lane. Cars are free to stop at their pit garage should this happen.

When the safety car is ready to leave the circuit it extinguishes its orange lights, indicating to the drivers that it will peel off into the pits at the end of the current lap. The drivers then continue in formation until they cross the start-finish line where green lights will indicate that they are free to race again.

In exceptional circumstances, such as in extremely poor weather, a race may begin behind the safety car, which will put its orange lights on at least a minute before the start to indicate this. When those lights switch to green the safety car will lead the field around the circuit in grid order.

Overtaking on this first lap is not allowed, unless a car has a problem. The safety car will peel into the pits at the end of the lap and drivers are free to race once they have crossed the line to commence the next lap.

All laps completed behind the safety car count as race laps. 

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60. Do the laps covered behind the safety car count?

Yes, all the laps covered behind the Safety Car count as part of the total distance of the race.  

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61. May a car stop at its pit whilst the safety car is on the track?

Yes, but it may only rejoin the track when the green light is on in the pit lane. It will be on at all times except when the Safety Car and the line of cars following it are about to pass or are passing the pit exit.

A car rejoining the track must proceed at reduced speed until it reaches the end of the line of cars behind the Safety Car.
Thus, a car which makes a pit stop in such circumstances will lose its position and rejoin the race at the back of the field, (but not necessarily in last place since there might be cars in the field which are one or more laps behind the car which made the pit-stop).  

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62. Is refuelling allowed during the race?
Yes, but it must be carried out with the refuelling equipment specified by the FIA. The system is based on aviation equipment and complies with all the other safety requirements laid down by the FIA. Refuelling is not obligatory.  

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63. What does the term “Parc Ferme” mean?
Parc Ferme is an enclosed and secure area in the paddock where the cars are weighed and any other checks deemed necessary by race officials are made. Teams must leave their cars here from 1830 on Saturday until 0830 on Sunday.

However, the cars are deemed to be under parc ferme conditions for a much longer period - from the time they first exit the pits during qualifying until the start of the formation lap immediately prior to the race.

Under these conditions, the work teams may carry out on their cars is limited to strictly-specified routine procedures, which can only be performed under the watchful eye of the FIA Technical Delegate and race scrutineers. Fuel may be added to the cars (those eligible for the final period of qualifying may only replace what they used in that period), tyres changed and brakes bled. Minor front wing adjustments are also allowed, but little else. These controls mean that teams cannot make significant alterations to the set-up of a car between qualifying and the race.

The only exception to this is when there is a "change in climatic conditions", for example a dry qualifying session followed by a wet race, or vice versa. In this case the FIA will give the teams permission to make further appropriate changes to their cars.

Should a car require an engine change between qualifying and the race, then the driver concerned will be required to start from the back of the grid. Modifications to other parts or suspension set-up will require the driver to start from the pit lane.

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64. Are there any speed limits?
Strange though it may seem, yes, but only in the pit lane, where the speed limit is either 80 or 120 kph (50 or 75 mph), depending on the circuit and the configuration of the pit lane.

There are electronic devices checking the speed of the cars along the whole of the pit lane; if a competitor exceeds the limit during the race, he is usually penalized with a time penalty (see question 44), whereas if he exceeds it during a practice session, he is usually given a fine ($ x km). However, as in everyday life, the severity of the punishment is proportional to the seriousness of the offence, and also takes repeat offences into account.

To avoid this, most of the constructors have equipped their cars with a speed limiter which the driver has to activate (usually by pressing a button on the steering wheel) as soon as he enters the pit lane. However, sometimes drivers forget to do so...  

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65. In what conditions are the cars weighed?
The Scrutineers may weigh the cars at all times, to make sure that they never weigh less than 600 kg, including driver. Electronic weighing devices are located at the entrance to the pit lane to enable these checks to be carried out. During qualifying practice, an electronic programme selects at random the cars which are to be checked.

When a car is chosen by the computer, a red light comes on and the driver returning to his pit must proceed to the weighing area. If the weight of the car is insufficient, the driver could be excluded from the event, but he has the right to request that the car be weighed a second time. To avoid cheating, any car which breaks down on the circuit also has to pass in front of the computer which decides whether the car must be weighed in the same conditions.

At the finish of the race, all the cars are directed to the Parc Ferme where they are weighed; the drivers are also weighed before proceeding to the podium or to their motorhome. If a car's weight does not comply at the finish, it maybe excluded from the classification. This has happened in the past.  

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66. What are the different signals which the officials may give to the competitors?
In addition to the red flag, "stopping the race", and the chequered flag, "end of the race", there are other flags, each having a specific meaning.

The blue flag during the race indicates that a driver is about to be lapped and it orders him to let the other car overtake, on pain of a time penalty for obstruction.

The yellow flag indicates danger, and overtaking under yellow flag is always prohibited. The yellow flag may have two meanings:

  • One waved = slow down
  • Double waved = slow down, prepare to stop if necessary

The green flag indicates the end of the danger and of the ban on overtaking.

The flag with vertical red and yellow stripes warns the competitors that the track is slippery (usually oil), and a black flag with an orange disc accompanied by the number of a car warns the driver that his car has a mechanical problem and that he must go to his pit.

A flag with a white triangle and a black triangle accompanied by the number of a car is a warning for unsporting behaviour.

The black flag, accompanied by the number of a car, summons the driver of such car to immediately return to his pit. This procedure is mostly used to notify a competitor of his exclusion from the race. 

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67. Does the chequered flag always signal the finish?
Yes, even if the chequered flag is waved too early, the race still ends when this signal is given. However, if the flag is waved too late the classification is that obtained at the end of the scheduled number of laps. Only cars which have covered 90% of the distance will be classified.

If a race is stopped before the full distance and a result is declared, the classification will reflect the race order at the end of the lap two laps prior to that on which the race was stopped. For example, if a race is stopped on lap 60, the classification will be as it was at the end of lap 58.

A driver does not necessarily have to still be on the track to be classified, but if a car takes more than twice as long as the fastest lap time achieved by the winner to complete his last lap, this lap will not be taken into account. 

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68. Is private testing on circuits authorised?
Private testing is forbidden:

  • On any circuit which appears on the Formula One World Championship calendar, except for Monza, Barcelona, Silverstone and Magny Cours
  • On all circuits during the week preceding the event (except for a shakedown test of no more than 50 km)
  • On any circuit which has not been approved for Formula One

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69. What are the specifications for Car Livery on Formula 1 Cars?
Teams must run their two cars with essentially the same race livery throughout the season and must seek prior approval for any major changes.

In addition there are a number of requirements that apply to liveries for all cars and teams. Every car must carry its driver’s race number, which must be clearly visible from the front of the car, and the driver’s name must appear on the external bodywork of the car. The team’s name or emblem must also appear on the nose of the car.

To help distinguish between a team’s two cars, the onboard cameras which sit on top of the main rollover structure are coloured differently. On the first car it must be predominantly fluorescent red and on the second car it must be fluorescent yellow.

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70. What are the rules and regulations for Suspending and Resuming Races?
If a race is suspended because of an accident or poor track conditions then red flags will be shown around the circuit. When this happens, the pit exit will be closed and all cars on track must proceed slowly to the red flag line without overtaking and then stop in staggered formation with the leading car at the front. Any driver pitting after the red flag signal will be given a drive-through penalty.

The safety car will then be driven to the front of the queue. While the race is suspended team members may come onto the track to work on the cars, but refuelling is not allowed.

Cars that were already in the pits when the red flag signal was given may be worked on there, with refuelling permitted. These cars, and any that enter the pits while the race is suspended, may only rejoin the track once the race has been resumed.

At least a ten minute warning will be given before the race is resumed behind the safety car, which will lead the field for one lap before pulling into the pits. As usual, overtaking behind the safety car is forbidden.

Before the safety car returns to the pits any lapped car between cars running on the lead lap must pass those cars and the safety car. It may then proceed around the track to take up position at the back of the line of front-running cars.

If for whatever reason it is impossible to resume the race, the rules state that “the results will be taken at the end of the penultimate lap before the lap during which the signal to suspend the race was given.

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71. What rules are applicable for Spare Cars and Engines?
FIA regulations state that drivers may have no more than three cars available for use at any one time. Usually a team will bring three or four cars to a race; a race car for each of its two drivers, and one or two spare cars for use by either driver. Use of those spare cars is subject to various restrictions.

If a driver switches car between qualifying and the race then he must start the race from the pit lane. A change of car is not allowed once the race has started.

There are also restrictions on engine use. Each driver may use no more than one engine for two consecutive Grand Prix meetings. If an engine change is required ahead of qualifying at either meeting, the driver will drop ten places on the grid for that event. If the change is made after qualifying, the driver goes to the back of the grid.

For the purposes of this engine regulation, the Grand Prix meeting comprises Saturday's practice and qualifying sessions, plus Sunday's race. During Friday's practice sessions, drivers may use alternative engines, with no penalty should such an engine fail.

If a driver fails to finish a race due to reasons beyond his or his team’s control, he may start the next meeting with a new engine without incurring a penalty.

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72. Do Formula 1 Cars go through any scrutiny?
A team of specially appointed scrutineers has the power to check cars at any point during a Grand Prix weekend to ensure that they fully comply with technical and safety regulations.

Every car is initially examined on the Thursday of a race meeting (Wednesday at Monaco) and a car cannot take part in the event until it has passed scrutineering. A car must be re-examined by scrutineers if any significant changes are made to it by the team or if it is involved in an accident.

In addition to scrutineering, cars are also weighed throughout the Grand Prix weekend to ensure that they comply with minimum weight requirements (currently 600kg including driver, except during qualifying when it is 605kg). During practice and qualifying cars are called in at random to be weighed. After the race every car and driver is weighed.

Any competitor failing to meet the minimum weight may lose their qualifying times or be excluded from the race results unless this is due to the accidental loss of part of the car. 

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